Psoriasis

We’re here to help you feel good about your skin! Because we, alongside our community of more than 60,000 people with different skin conditions, know how much your skin can affect you if it does not do what you want it to.

So, we turned skincare upside down and kept you and your specific needs at the heart of things. At Nøie, we customise your skincare by evaluating your individual skin profile and adjusting our products as your skin develops.

Below you’ll learn more about psoriasis, its underlying causes and what you can do to treat it as effectively as possible.

What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition characterised by raised, red, scaly plaques. Most often, these show up on the elbows, knees, scalp and lower back. It affects 2-4% of men and women, and it can start at any age, including childhood, with peaks of onset at 15–25 years and 50–60 years. It tends to persist as a lifelong condition, although it fluctuates in extent and severity.

Studies have shown that by applying moisturiser on a daily basis, it's possible to lower the severity of flare-ups, and even prolong the remission periods between them

Psoriasis as a disease can be subdivided into five official types. These five different types of psoriasis have very distinct characteristics, severities and frequencies.

Plaque psoriasis:

Plaque psoriasis, or psoriasis vulgaris, is the most common form of psoriasis and accounts for 80% of all cases. It’s characterised by thick red patches of skin, which are often accompanied by a white scaly layer composed of dead skin cells called keratinocytes. Plaque psoriasis often affects the elbows, knees, lower back and/or scalp with patches between 1 to 10 centimeters wide — but can in some cases be larger and cover more of the body.

Guttate psoriasis:

Guttate psoriasis is the second most dominant type of psoriasis, and makes up approximately 10% of all cases. It’s characterised by small spots that are separately located and have a drop-shaped outline. Normally, guttate psoriasis affects the torso and limbs, but in some cases it also affects both the face and scalp. The spots usually aren’t as thick as plaque psoriasis, but they can develop into plaque psoriasis over time.

Flexural or inverse psoriasis:

Flexural or inverse psoriasis often appears in skinfolds, such as under the breasts or in the armpits or groin area. It’s characterised by red skin lesions, which are often shiny and smooth, too. Due to this appearance, it is often misdiagnosed as a fungal or bacterial infection; however, people with inverse psoriasis often also have another form of psoriasis on the body, which serves as a biomarker for the correct diagnosis. Sweat and moisture from skinfolds keep inverse psoriasis from shedding skin scales, which makes skin-on-skin contact very uncomfortable.

Pustular psoriasis:

Pustular psoriasis is a very severe form of psoriasis that quickly develops into many white pustules surrounded by red skin. Sometimes, these isolated pustules join together and form scaling. Pustular psoriasis may affect isolated areas of the body, like the hands or feet, or even cover most of the skin’s surface. Some people affected by pustular psoriasis experience cyclic periods of pustules and remission, and symptoms often associated with this type of psoriasis are fever, chills, rapid pulse, muscle weakness or loss of appetite.

Erythrodermic psoriasis:

Erythrodermic psoriasis, or exfoliating psoriasis, is a rare type of psoriasis that resembles severe burns. The condition is serious, and can sometimes be a medical emergency because the body loses its ability to regulate its temperature. It is often characterised by widespread, red and scaly areas covering large portions of the body.

What causes psoriasis?

The precise cause of psoriasis is unknown. However, it is known that it is an immune-related inflammatory disease, and that both inherited and environmental factors play a role in its development. The crux of the issue is that the outer layer of skin (the epidermis) contains skin cells which are continuously being replaced. This process normally takes between three and four weeks — but with psoriasis, there is an excessively rapid production timeline for new skin cells. These are formed and shed in as little as three or four days. This leads to the scaly plaques and patches of skin that are characteristic of psoriasis.

What is the first line of treatment?

Among healthcare practitioners, it is well accepted that moisturisers should be considered the first line of treatment, even though prescription medication is often a necessary part of the treatment regime. But studies have shown that by applying moisturiser on a daily basis, it's possible to lower the severity of flare-ups, and even prolong the remission periods between them.

Among users who have reported being affected by psoriasis and have been diagnosed by a dermatologist, Nøie has generated results for 75.0% of them after only 21 days, which is impressively high for moisturisers

What can Nøie do?

Among users who have reported being affected by psoriasis and have been diagnosed by a dermatologist, Nøie has generated results for 75.0% of them after only 21 days, which is impressively high for moisturisers. But we also accept our products’ limitations, which is why you should see us as a supplementary treatment — not as a substitution for what your healthcare practitioner might have prescribed for you.

Does this sound like your skin?

Fill out your skin profile and try out your customised skincare.

START SKIN TEST

Want to know more?

Check out our other articles about eczema, dry skin, combination/acne-prone skin, sensitive skin, and general skincare.

Customised skincare that works. Really.

It's time for a new approach to problematic skin: one that's smart, helpful, and above all - honest.

START SKIN TEST